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Pen and Ink

PEN & INK

These drawings are from a series of books about the history of a private ranch in northern California. The ranch is held in conservation to protect both the cultural and natural resources there. It sits in the Sierra foothills, just above the convergence of three rivers, and features a wide variety of important habitat. Some of the cultural artifacts on the land indicate that humans have occupied this territory for perhaps thousands of years.

Grey Pine (Pinus sabiniana)
Grey Pine (Pinus sabiniana)

From a series depicting the characteristic plants of the Sierra foothills.

California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)
California Condor (Gymnogyps californianus)
Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
Northern Pacific Rattlesnake

Crotalus oreganus - the Northern Pacific Rattlesnake - is an abundant resident of the western states. Rattlesnakes have a key role to play in ecosystem balance.

Three baskets
Three baskets

These baskets are currently housed in the Sutter County Community Memorial Museum. They were made by the indigenous communities of the Sierra Foothills near the confluence of the Yuba and Feather Rivers in California.

Cradle board
Cradle board

From the indigenous people of the Sierra foothills, at the confluence of the Yuba and Feather Rivers.

Seed beater basket
Seed beater basket

This basket was used to collect seeds from native plants. Indigenous women were the primary tenders of this critical food source. This basket was likely made by a woman living in the Sierra foothills at the confluence of the Yuba and Feather Rivers.

Norther Pintails (Anas acuta)
Norther Pintails (Anas acuta)
Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa)
Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)
California Quail (Callipepla californica)

Male and female pair of the California state bird.

Bedrock mortars
Bedrock mortars

In the Sierra Foothills, just above the confluence of the Yuba and Feather Rivers, the presence of these mortars indicates a thriving community of people living in this area. Mortars were used to grind nuts, seeds, and fruits. This area has one of the largest concentrations of bedrock mortars in the state of California.

Valley Oak (Quercus lobata)
Valley Oak (Quercus lobata)

From a series of books about the natural and cultural history of a ranch in the Sierra foothills of California.

Native bunch grasses
Native bunch grasses

Another from the series depicting native bunch grasses of California. This features Creeping Wild Rye (Elymus triticoides) and Purple Needlegrass (Stipa pulchra).